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Security Education Companion
A free resource for digital security educators

Welcome to the Security Education Companion! SEC is a resource for people teaching digital security to their friends and neighbors.

If you are new to digital security, want tutorials for privacy-protecting tools, or want translated guides in 11 languages, head to Surveillance Self-Defense (SSD).

Lessons

Putting together a lesson plan for a digital security workshop? Check out our beginner-friendly lesson modules.

Two-Factor Authentication

Duration: 1 hour - 2 hours and 30 minutes
BeginningIntermediate

End-to-End Encrypted Communications: Phone Apps

Duration: 1 hour - 2 hours
BeginningIntermediate

Security News

Want to stay up-to-date with security news? Check out our curated posts from EFF's Deeplinks blog.

Watering Holes and Million Dollar Dissidents: the Changing Economics of Digital Surveillance

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Recently, Google’s Project Zero published a report describing a newly-discovered campaign of surveillance using chains of zero day iOS exploits to spy on iPhones. This campaign employed multiple compromised websites in what is known as a “watering hole” attack. The compromised websites would automatically run the chain of exploits on anyone who visited, with the aim of installing a surveillance implant on the device. Google didn’t reveal the names of the websites or indeed who was being...

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Browsers Take a Stand Against Kazakhstan’s Invasive Internet Surveillance

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Yesterday, Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox, and Apple’s Safari browsers started blocking a security certificate previously used by Kazakh ISPs to compromise their users’ security and perform dragnet surveillance. We encourage other browsers to take similar security measures. Since the fix has been implemented upstream in Chromium, it shouldn’t take long for other Chromium-based browsers, like Brave, Opera, and Microsoft’s Edge, to do the same.

What Happened, and Why Is... Read More

Amazon’s Ring Is a Perfect Storm of Privacy Threats

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Doors across the United States are now fitted with Amazon’s Ring, a combination doorbell-security camera that records and transmits video straight to users’ phones, to Amazon’s cloud—and often to the local police department. By sending photos and alerts every time the camera detects motion or someone rings the doorbell, the app can create an illusion of a household under siege. It turns what seems like a perfectly safe neighborhood into a source of anxiety and fear. This raises the...

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