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Security Education Companion
A free resource for digital security educators

Welcome to the Security Education Companion! SEC is a resource for people teaching digital security to their friends and neighbors.

If you are new to digital security, want tutorials for privacy-protecting tools, or want translated guides in 11 languages, head to Surveillance Self-Defense (SSD).

Lessons

Putting together a lesson plan for a digital security workshop? Check out our beginner-friendly lesson modules.

Threat Modeling

Duration: 30 minutes - 1 hour and 30 minutes
BeginningIntermediate

Passwords

Duration: 30 minutes - 1 hour
BeginningIntermediate

Phishing and Malware

Duration: 1 hour
Beginning

Security News

Want to stay up-to-date with security news? Check out our curated posts from EFF's Deeplinks blog.

Sextortion Scam: What to Do If You Get the Latest Phishing Spam Demanding Bitcoin

Phishing2b

You may have arrived at this post because you received an email from a purported hacker who is demanding payment or else they will send compromising information—such as pictures sexual in nature—to all your friends and family. You’re searching for what to do in this frightening situation.

Don’t panic. Contrary to the claims in your email, you haven't been hacked (or at least, that's not what prompted that email). This is merely a new variation on an old scam which is popularly...

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Moving Your Site From "Not Secure" to Secure

Http warning

Maybe you’re a beginner to web development, but you’ve done the hard work: you taught yourself what you needed to know, and you’ve lovingly made that website and filled it with precious content. But one last task remains: you don’t have that little green padlock with the word “secure” beside your website’s address. You don’t yet have that magical “S” after “HTTP”.

You might have heard or noticed recently that something is different on Google Chrome: if your website does not have a...

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Google Chrome Now Marks HTTP Sites "Not Secure"

Http warning

Last week, the movement to encrypt the web achieved another milestone: Google’s Chrome browser made good on its promise to mark all HTTP sites “not secure.” EFF welcomes this move, and we are calling on other browsers to follow suit.

This is the latest in the web’s massive shift from non-secure HTTP to the more secure, encrypted HTTPS protocol. All web servers use one of these two protocols to get web pages from the server to your browser. HTTP has serious problems that make it...

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