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Security Education Companion
A free resource for digital security educators

Security News

Security News is an archive of curated EFF Deeplinks posts for trainers, technologists, and educators who teach digital security.

Issues that we track here include: country-specific policy updates on security and privacy, updates on malware and vulnerabilities, discussions on encryption and privacy-protecting tools, updates on surveillance (corporate surveillance, street-level surveillance, and mass surveillance), device searches by law and border enforcement, tracking via devices, and general digital security tips.

Skip the Surveillance By Opting Out of Face Recognition At Airports

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Government agencies and airlines have ignored years of warnings from privacy groups and Senators that using face recognition technology on travelers would massively violate their privacy. Now, the passengers are in revolt as well, and they’re demanding answers.

Last week, a lengthy exchange on Twitter between a traveler who was concerned about her privacy and a spokesperson for the airline JetBlue went viral, and many of the questions asked by the traveler and others were the same...

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Google's Sensorvault Can Tell Police Where You've Been

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Do you know where you were five years ago? Did you have an Android phone at the time? It turns out Google might know—and it might be telling law enforcement.

In a new article, the New York Times details a little-known technique increasingly used by law enforcement to figure out everyone who might have been within certain geographic areas during specific time periods in the past. The technique relies on detailed location data collected by Google from most Android devices as...

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The Ecuadorean Authorities Have No Reason to Detain Free Software Developer Ola Bini

Hours after the ejection of Julian Assange from the London Ecuadorean embassy last week, police officers in Ecuador detained the Swedish citizen and open source developer Ola Bini. They seized him as he prepared to travel from his home in Quito to Japan, claiming that he was attempting to flee the country in the wake of Assange’s arrest. Bini had, in fact, booked the vacation long ago, and had publicly mentioned it on his twitter account before Assange was arrested.

Ola’s detention...

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The Ecuadorean Authorities Have No Reason to Detain Free Software Developer Ola Bini

Hours after the ejection of Julian Assange from the London Ecuadorean embassy last week, police officers in Ecuador detained the Swedish citizen and open source developer Ola Bini. They seized him as he prepared to travel from his home in Quito to Japan, claiming that he was attempting to flee the country in the wake of Assange’s arrest. Bini had, in fact, booked the vacation long ago, and had publicly mentioned it on his twitter account before Assange was arrested.

Ola’s detention...

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Facebook Got Caught Phishing For Friends

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Once again, Facebook is in the news for bad security practices, dark design patterns, and secretly reappropriating sensitive data meant for “authentication” to its own ends. Incredibly, this time, the company managed to accomplish all three in one fell swoop.

What happened?

Last weekend, news broke that Facebook has been demanding some new users enter their email passwords in order to sign up for an account on the site. First publicized by cybersecurity specialist e-sushi on...

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Who Defends Your Data? Report Reveals Peruvian ISPs Progress on User Privacy, Still Room for Improvement

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Hiperderecho, the leading digital rights organization in Peru, in collaboration with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, today launched its second ¿Quien Defiende Tus Datos? (Who Defends Your Data?), an evaluation of the privacy practices of the Internet Service Providers (ISPs) that millions of Peruvians use every day.  This year's results are more encouraging than those in 2015's report, with Telefonica's Movistar making significant improvement in its privacy policy,...

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Here’s Why You Can’t Trust What Cops and Companies Claim About Automated License Plate Readers

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Emails Prove ICE Could Access Data from Orange County Shopping Malls, Despite the Companies' Denials

In response to an ACLU report on how law enforcement agencies share information collected by automated license plate readers (ALPRs) with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, officials have been quick to deny and obfuscate despite documentary evidence obtained directly from ICE itself through a Freedom of Information Act lawsuit

Let’s be clear: you can’t trust what ALPR...

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A Privacy-Focused Facebook? We'll Believe It When We See It.

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In his latest announcement, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg embraces privacy and security fundamentals like end-to-end encrypted messaging. But announcing a plan is one thing. Implementing it is entirely another. And for those reading between the lines of Zuckerberg’s pivot-to-privacy manifesto, it’s clear that this isn’t just about privacy. It’s also about competition.

The Proof is in the Pudding

At the core of Zuckerberg’s announcement is Facebook’s plan to merge its three...

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Facebook Doubles Down On Misusing Your Phone Number

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When we publicly demanded that Facebook stop messing with users’ phone numbers last week, we weren’t expecting the social network to double down quite like this: By default, anyone can use the phone number that a user provides for two-factor authentication (2FA) to find that user’s profile. For people who need 2FA to protect their account and stay safe, Facebook is forcing them into unnecessarily choosing between security and privacy.

While settings are available to choose...

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Massive Database Leak Gives Us a Window into China’s Digital Surveillance State

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Earlier this month, security researcher Victor Gevers found and disclosed an exposed database live-tracking the locations of about 2.6 million residents of Xinjiang, China, offering a window into what a digital surveillance state looks like in the 21st century.

Xinjiang is China’s largest province, and home to China’s Uighurs, a Turkic minority group. Here, the Chinese government has implemented a testbed police state where an estimated 1 million individuals from these minority...

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Fix It Already: Nine Steps That Companies Should Take To Protect You

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Today we are announcing Fix It Already, a new way to show companies we're serious about the big security and privacy issues they need to fix. We are demanding fixes for different issues from nine tech companies and platforms, targeting social media companies, operating systems, and enterprise platforms on issues ranging from encryption design to retention policies.

Some of these issues stem from business decisions. Some are security holes. Some are design choices. The common...

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Watching the Black Body

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[This is a guest post authored by Malkia Cyril, executive director of the Center for Media Justice. It was originally published in The End of Trust (McSweeney's 54)]

In December 2017, FBI agents forced Rakem Balogun and his fifteen-year-old son out of their Dallas home. They arrested Balogun on charges of illegal firearms possession and seized a book called Negroes with Guns. After being denied bail and spending five months in prison, Balogun was released with all charges...

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ETS Isn't TLS and You Shouldn't Use It

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The good news: TLS 1.3 is available, and the protocol, which powers HTTPS and many other encrypted communications, is better and more secure than its predecessors (including SSL).

The bad news: Thanks to a financial industry group called BITS, there’s a look-alike protocol brewing called ETS (or eTLS) that intentionally disables important security measures in TLS 1.3. If someone suggests that you should deploy ETS instead of TLS 1.3, they are selling you snake oil and you should...

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Cyber-Mercenary Groups Shouldn't be Trusted in Your Browser or Anywhere Else

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Update 2019-06-21: DarkMatter has renamed its CA business Digital Trust – Sole Proprietorship L.L.C. (“DigitalTrust”). The criticisms below still apply.

DarkMatter, the notorious cyber-mercenary firm based in the United Arab Emirates, is seeking to become approved as a top-level certificate authority in Mozilla’s root certificate program. Giving such a trusted position to this company would be a very bad idea. DarkMatter has a business interest in subverting encryption, and would...

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What’s the Emergency? Keeping International Requests for Law Enforcement Access Secure and Safe for Internet Users

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Law enforcement access to data is in the middle of a profound shake-up across the globe. States are pushing to get quicker, deeper, and more invasive access to personal data stored on the global Internet, and are looking to water down the international safeguards around privacy and due process in the name of “speed” and “modernization.”

One part of that push is concentrated on the Council of Europe’s Cybercrime Convention (also known as the “Budapest Convention”) — an international...

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Designing Welcome Mats to Invite User Privacy

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The way we design user interfaces can have a profound impact on the privacy of a user’s data. It should be easy for users to make choices that protect their data privacy. But all too often, big tech companies instead design their products to manipulate users into surrendering their data privacy. These methods are often called “Dark Patterns.”

When you purchase a new phone, tablet, or “smart” device, you expect to have to set it up with the needed credentials for it to be fully...

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Powerful Permissions, Wimpy Warnings: Installing a Root Certificate Should be Scary

More lessons from "Facebook Research"

Last week, Facebook was caught using a sketchy market research app to gobble large amounts of sensitive user activity after instructing users to alter the root certificate store on their phones. A day after, Google pulled a similar iOS “research program” app. Both of these programs are a clear breach of user trust that we have written about extensively.

This news also drew attention to an area both Android and iOS could improve on. Asking...

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Powerful Permissions, Wimpy Warnings: Installing a Root Certificate Should be Scary

More lessons from "Facebook Research"

Last week, Facebook was caught using a sketchy market research app to gobble large amounts of sensitive user activity after instructing users to alter the root certificate store on their phones. A day after, Google pulled a similar iOS “research program” app. Both of these programs are a clear breach of user trust that we have written about extensively.

This news also drew attention to an area both Android and iOS could improve on. Asking...

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The San Francisco District Attorney’s 10 Most Surveilled Neighborhoods

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Launch map in new window (Google privacy policy applies). 

With the spread of advanced spying technology, such as social media monitoring and cell-phone tracking, it’s easy to forget...

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Google Screenwise: An Unwise Trade of All Your Privacy for Cash

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Imagine this: an enormous tech company is tracking what you do on your phone, even when you’re not using any of its services, down to the specific images that you see. It’s also tracking all of your network traffic, because you’re installing one of its specially-designed routers. And even though some of that traffic is encrypted, it can still know what websites you visit, due to how DNS resolution works. Oh, it’s also recording audio from a custom-microphone that’s placed near your...

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What We Should Learn From “Facebook Research”

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Once again, Facebook has broken the trust of its users—this time, through reportedly paying people to give up their privacy by installing an application that sucks up huge amounts of sensitive data, and explicitly sidestepping Apple's Enterprise Developer program rules. In doing so, the company has repeated several of the privacy-abusive practices that it’s been chastised for before. This underscores just how little the company has learned from a year of user complaints, privacy group...

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A Surveillance Wall Is Not a Good Alternative to a Concrete Wall

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Since even before he took office, President Trump has called for a physical wall along the southern border of the United States. Many different organizations have argued this isn’t a great idea. In response, some Congressional Democrats have suggested turning to surveillance technology to monitor the border instead of a physical barrier.

Without specific legislative proposals, it’s hard to know what these suggestions actually mean. However, any bill Congress considers related to...

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The 5G Protocol May Still Be Vulnerable to IMSI Catchers

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It’s hard to talk about the vulnerabilities in cellular technology without increasing the amount of fear, uncertainty, and doubt. There is already much uncertainty around cell-site simulators (CSS, aka Stingrays), their capabilities, and how widely they are used. Partly this is because of the veil of secrecy that has surrounded the workings of commercial cell-site simulators thanks to the widespread use of non-disclosure agreements by the manufacturing companies like Rayzone and Harris...

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A Guided Tour of the Data Facebook Uses to Target Ads

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Last week, Pew released the results of a survey investigating how users understand Facebook’s data collection practices and how they react when shown what the platform thinks it knows about them. The upshot is that 74% of users weren’t aware that Facebook assembles lists of their interests and traits. 88% of respondents were assigned “categories” for advertising, which could include racial or ethnic “affinities” and political leanings. 58% of those users were “not comfortable” with the...

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Detecting Ghosts By Reverse Engineering: Who Ya Gonna Call?

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This article was first published on Lawfare.

The most recent purportedly serious proposal by a Western government to force technology companies to provide access to the content of encrypted communications comes from Ian Levy and Crispin Robinson of the Government Communications Headquarters, or GCHQ, the U.K.’s equivalent of the National Security Agency. Cryptography luminaries such as Susan Landau, Matt Green, and Bruce Schneier have published detailed critiques of this...

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